National Training Laboratories

NTLs standardsvar til henvendelser om pyramiden er følgende:

«Thanks for your interest in NTL Institute. We are happy to respond to your inquiry about The Learning Pyramid. It was developed and used by NTL Institute at our Bethel, Maine campus in the early sixties when we were still a part of the National Education Association’s Adult Education Division.
While we believe it to be accurate, we no longer have- nor can we find- the original research that supports the numbers.
We get many inquiries every month about this- and many, many people have searched for the original research and have come up empty handed. We know that in 1954 a similar pyramid with slightly different numbers appeared on p. 43 of a book called Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching, published by the Edgar Dale Dryden Press in New York however the Learning Pyramid as such seems to have been modified and remains attributed to NTL Institute.

To summarize the numbers (which sometimes get cited differently) learners retain approximately:
90% of what they learn when they teach someone else/use immediately.
75% of what they learn when they practice what they learned.
50% of what they learn when engaged in a group discussion.
30% of what they learn when they see a demonstration.
20% of what they learn from audio-visual.
10% of what they learn when they’ve learned from reading.
5% of what they learn when they’ve learned from lecture.

Feel free to use the Learning Pyramid (below) as you wish without charge – and cite at the bottom – «NTL Institute for Applied Behavioral Science, 1901 South Bell Street #300 Arlington, VA 22202. 1-800-777-5227.»»

Will Thalheimer («NTL continues its delusions«) tåler godt å siteres i sammenheng med dette skrivet:

«Here are claims that NTL makes in its letter that are false:

NTL: We know that in 1954 a similar pyramid with slightly different numbers appeared on p. 43 of a book called Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching, published by the Edgar Dale Dryden Press in New York.

Why false? There are NO numbers on page 43 of Edgar Dale’s book.

NTL: We are happy to respond to your inquiry about The Learning Pyramid. Yes, it was developed and used by NTL Institute at our Bethel, Maine campus in the early sixties when we were still part of the National Education Association’s Adult Education Division.

Very Intriguing: How could NTL have developed the pyramid in the 1960’s, when a similar version was published by Edgar Dale in 1954? Professor Michael Molenda of Indiana University has found some evidence that the numbers first appeared in the 1940’s. Maybe NTL has a time machine.

NTL: Yet the Learning Pyramid as such seems to have been modified and always has been attributed to NTL Institute.

No. It wasn’t attributed to NTL by Dale. Dale thought it was his. And again, Dale did not use any numbers. Just a cone.»

La oss videre ta fatt i følgende formulering fra NTLs brev:

«While we believe it to be accurate, we no longer have- nor can we find- the original research that supports the numbers.
We get many inquiries every month about this- and many, many people have searched for the original research and have come up empty handed. We know that in 1954 a similar pyramid with slightly different numbers appeared on p. 43 of a book called Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching, published by the Edgar Dale Dryden Press in New York however the Learning Pyramid as such seems to have been modified and remains attributed to NTL Institute.»

Dette blir bare spekulasjoner, men ut fra sitatet ovenfor kan det se ut som at det er det faktum at modellen ofte refereres til NTL som gjør at NTL er overbevist om at det er de selv som opprinnelig står bak den. Om så er tilfellet, vil brevet ovenfor slutte en ond sirkel. Ved slik å gjenta påstanden vil de få flere brukere av pyramiden til å referere til NTL, og NTL vil i sin tur styrkes i sin tro om at dette er riktig.

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